Wassom’s Marketing Wisdom

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First Impressions Count!

Posted by juliewassom on September 17, 2013

I like to say, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” How true that is for you with the impression you and your center make on an enrollment prospect. That impression contributes to the image in their minds of how their child will adjust and be treated in your care, and it has strong impact on their enrollment choice.

Here are three areas you can impact to make that first impression a positive one:

1.      Answer your telephone professionally.

Your first contact with many prospects will be by telephone. You only get a few seconds on the phone before they have formed a first impression. Answer with a professional- sounding greeting and dialogue used by all who answer anywhere in the center. Remember to use a positive tone, a volume appropriate to the call (versus the class you just left), and to answer with a smile on your face. For years, I have said, “You can hear a smile on the telephone.” And it is true!

2.      Make your center’s entry inviting.

Walk into your center as if you were an apprehensive parent. What about the first six feet inside the door makes you want to come in any further. Does it look clean and welcoming? Does it smell good? Are there materials of interest to parents of young children? Is there information available about your center and its services? And – very important – are you or your assistant right there to welcome them and show them your center (especially if they have a scheduled visit)? If they are not comfortable in the entryway, it is going to be tough to make a good impression anywhere else in the center.

3.      Insist upon a positive greeting from teachers.

Parents know their child will spend most of their center time with the teacher, not the director. When a parent walks into a classroom, it is a must that the teacher looks up, SMILES, and, if possible, says “Hello.” For scheduled visits, the teacher and director may have arranged for the teacher to spend some time talking to the visiting parents. It is also impressive when the teacher invites the visiting child to join in the activities going on in the room. At the very least, the director should introduce the teacher, and the teacher should acknowledge the visitors and, if possible, shake hands. A friendly greeting from the teachers is also important once the parent has enrolled and is bringing their child into the classroom on a daily basis. Though the first impression may help get them there, an ongoing impression will help keep them there.

First impressions count – for enrollment securement and for parent retention. Make yours the best they can be.

Best wishes and happy marketing!

Julie Wassom
“The Speaker Whose Message Means Business”
Marketing and Sales Speaker/Consultant/Author
Call me: 303-693-2306
Fax me: 303-617-6422
E-me: julie@juliewassom.com
See me: www.juliewassom.com

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Posted in Ask Julie, Budget for Marketing, Child Care Marketing, Economy, Marketing Tips, Sharing What Works, Your Business | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

What Closing Is Not!

Posted by juliewassom on August 27, 2013

The skill of closing – or asking for a center visit or a commitment to enrollment – is an uncomfortable skill for many directors to master. Because you know it is a critical skill for converting more prospects to enrollees, it is very tempting to dance around actually asking the right questions and still call it closing.

What is closing? Closing is really two things.

  1. Helping prospects make a good buying decision
  2. Getting your prospects to act on your recommendations.

If you are upholding your desired positioning of being the helpful, professional, knowledgeable resource, your prospects will turn to you for your expertise and help in this important buying decision. They want your recommendations. They want your invitations. But that is not enough and it is NOT closing. Closing is ASKING them to make a buying decision. If you do not ask for the visit or enrollment, you are NOT closing.

What is NOT closing?

1. Making a recommendation without asking for a commitment is NOT closing.

As nice as it may sound, a statement such as, “It looks as though Mike really does not want to leave the soft play area. I think he would really enjoy our center. We would love to have you join our center’s family. Why don’t you give it some thought and let me know,” is NOT closing. It’s a great recommendation, but you had an enrollment bird in hand that you let fly away to another center where the director who asked would get the enrollment.

You can turn this recommendation into a valid closing by asking a question like this…

“…I think he would really enjoy our center. Since he seems so comfortable, would you like to leave him for a free day today? (This of course assumes you have the room and the policy of free days in your company.) When your prospect answers, “Yes,” you can then take her to your office to fill out necessary paperwork, and arrange a time to call her to tell her how Mike is doing. When she returns to pick him up is when you would ask her to enroll.

Or you could say…

“ … We would love to have you join our center’s family. Do you think you would like to do that? When the prospect says, “Yes,” perhaps that is the time to ask if Mike would like to stay to enjoy some time with the class while you take her to your office to fill out the paperwork and collect the registration fee.

2. Extending an invitation to an upcoming event at the center is NOT closing for a scheduled center visit or the enrollment.

Is it a good idea to invite prospects to center events? Absolutely! Is this a question that asks for the visit or enrollment? No!

“We are having an open house next Thursday to give our parents a glimpse of what our summer program will be like. You are certainly invited to attend. Would you like to come and bring Samantha?”

This is NOT closing for the scheduled center tour or enrollment. Granted, they might enroll after they attend such an event, but this is not closing for the center visit at the time you originally had them on the phone. Nor would it pass if you extended this invitation during a center visit, but did not also ASK for the enrollment.

It would be a closing question if you said this…

“… You are certainly invited to attend. When you come in for a center visit, I will give you all the details for this upcoming event. Would it be better for you to stop by for your personal visit on Wednesday morning or is Thursday better for your schedule?”

During a center visit, this invitation could lead to actual closing questions by saying…

“…our summer program will be like. It would be an ideal first parent event for you and Samantha to attend once you have enrolled. Would you like to go ahead and give me your registration fee today, and then I’ll make sure you are on the list for those who receive a special invitation to this even, alright?”

Closing is asking a question the answer to which is a commitment for your goal achievement, which is either a center visit or an enrollment commitment. If you have not asked for this specifically, you are not yet really closing, and your conversion ratios will reflect it.

Here’s a little trick to help you remember to ask a closing question, not just to invite or recommend. Put five pennies in one pocket at the beginning of the day. Every time you talk to a parent or give a tour of your center and you REALLY ASK A CLOSING QUESTION, move one penny from that pocket to the pocket on the other side of your skirt or slacks. Be honest about this. Don’t move the penny unless you asked a question that will give you an answer directed at your goals of center visit or enrollment. When you have all five pennies moved over, give yourself a point on a chart. Then move the pennies to the other side the same way, always giving yourself a point for every five closing questions you ask correctly. Even if the prospect’s answer is not yet “Yes,” you still ASKED a closing question, so you get the point. Once you have ten points (for 50 closing questions), reward yourself! You deserve it.

No matter what your personal reward, the reward that will really make your center shine is that you will see your conversion ratios gradually getting better, your follow up calls reducing, and your enrollments climbing like a rocket!

Best wishes and happy marketing!

Julie Wassom
“The Speaker Whose Message Means Business”
Marketing and Sales Speaker/Consultant/Author
Call me: 303-693-2306
Fax me: 303-617-6422
E-me: julie@juliewassom.com
See me: www.juliewassom.com

Posted in Ask Julie, Budget for Marketing, Child Care Marketing, Economy, Marketing Tips, Sharing What Works, Your Business | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Ten Tips for Using Newsletters as a Marketing Tool – Part 1

Posted by juliewassom on August 20, 2013

Newsletters can be a very effective method of communicating with prospects, customers, and opinion influencers. However, to be an effective marketing strategy, there are several factors you must consider. Before sitting down at your computer to type out an article or calendar of events, have firm answers to the following:

1.      Intent – What do you want your newsletter to do? Do you want it to educate, generate inquiries, build image, create positioning? List everything you want it to do.

2.      Frequency – How often will you publish it? A minimum of quarterly gives you repeat exposure without the perception of overwhelming intrusion, though many centers find  a monthly newsletter more effective for parents.

3.      Format – What will your newsletter look like? Think about the number of pages, page size, graphic design, ink colors, photos or drawings, location of regular columns. Will it be a self-mailer, inserted in an envelope, handed out at the center, or an e-letter?

4.      Title/Masthead – What will be the name of your newsletter? Make your masthead unique but consistent with the rest of your marketing materials. If you have regular columns, what will you call them that describes content and entices readers to linger there long enough to read it?

5.      Content – What will be included in the content of your newsletter. Keep it simple and valuable to the recipient. Most of us already have too much to read. If you regularly give your recipients information of value in your newsletter (versus primarily advertising for your center), you will create what’s called “ready readership,” meaning a target of readers waiting for each new issue. That’s what you want, because it creates a positioning for you as the helpful, knowledgeable expert.

Julie Wassom
“The Speaker Whose Message Means Business”
Marketing and Sales Speaker/Consultant/Author
Call me: 303-693-2306
Fax me: 303-617-6422
E-me: julie@juliewassom.com
See me: www.juliewassom.com

Posted in Ask Julie, Budget for Marketing, Child Care Marketing, Economy, Marketing Tips, Sharing What Works, Your Business | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Do You Know Where Your Customers Are?

Posted by juliewassom on August 13, 2013

Today’s prospects seeking early care and education services are looking in ways you may not realize. And you may be trying to reach them by marketing in all the wrong places. Though attracting qualified prospects is still most successful by layering your marketing activities amongst several methods of marketing communications, knowing where you customers go to find you is crucial to generating a high rate of inquiries for your efforts.

There’s more investigation online, you say. That’s an understatement. It’s not just about searching. It’s about what brand they follow and ultimately buy. Research firm, Digital Surgeons, reports via i-librarian that of the nearly 500 million users of FaceBook worldwide, 29% of 18 to 25 year olds and 23% of 26- 34 year olds use it. Of all ages on Facebook, 41% log in daily, 40% follow a brand, and 51% will purchase the brand they follow over another brand. Interestingly, some 30% log in via a mobile device.

So prospects are not only using key words to search for websites, they are significantly influenced by the public opinion they find online. Though face to face referrals are still very powerful, this kind of information gives the term, “word-of-mouth” a whole new meaning.

What are important action steps for you to take to connect with your key target audiences?

Have a good website. Make it easy to find, easy to navigate, and full of opportunities for prospects to learn about your unique attributes and to contact you.

Maximize your ranking on search engines. Search Engine Optimization is critical for your site, since most web visitors will not look past the first several listings. One technique to help increase your ranking is to use very specific keywords on every page of your website. Programs such as Google Analytics are a good place to start.

Explore social media. This wave is not going away anytime soon. If you are not riding it, you are missing an opportunity to engage with potential and existing customers. For professional assistance in this arena, I recommend a firm I use called New Media Fluent. Check them out at http://www.newmediafluent.com.

Track online mentions of your company name. This is one way to remain aware of what’s being said about you, to rapidly respond to any negative comments, and to help shape public opinion into what you want your prospects, customers, and opinion influencers to have.

Train your directors and managers in successful conversion skills. Of course, I am biased on this one, but it’s true. If you use superb marketing to generate qualified inquiries, but your managers do not have the skills and confidence to convert them, you have not succeeded in maximizing the return on your marketing investment. Whether it’s my on-site seminars, teleseminars, forthcoming webinars, or resources from my Enrollment Building Success Library, the training IS available to you for the taking. Do it.

Knowing who your customers are, where they look for child care choices, how to find you, and how they make the decision to put you on the list of programs they contact are all important steps in building enrollment. Base your marketing action plan on this knowledge and you will be off to a year of maximizing your enrollment.

More on Julie’s Enrollment Conversion Training

Julie Wassom
“The Speaker Whose Message Means Business”
Marketing and Sales Speaker/Consultant/Author
Call me: 303-693-2306
Fax me: 303-617-6422
E-me: julie@juliewassom.com
See me: www.juliewassom.com

Posted in Ask Julie, Budget for Marketing, Child Care Marketing, Economy, Marketing Tips, Sharing What Works, Your Business | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Saturation Marketing

Posted by juliewassom on August 6, 2013

I recently read the following in a newsletter from my speaking colleague, Tom Letourneau, a marketing specialist in the banking and financial services industries. I thought it a concept worth sharing with you. Actually, the concept of layering your marketing communications messages to your target markets has been around for a long time, but calling it “saturation marketing” helps drive home the importance of using all of those four methods of marketing communications I talk about – advertising, public relations, community involvement, and customer relations – to generate more inquiries and referrals than ever before.

Here’s what Tom had to say:

I coined the term Saturation Marketing not too long ago to mean doing everything possible to market, promote and sell your products and services. But it is more than that—it is a mindset. Saturation Marketing means direct mail, web sites and telemarketing. It means cold calling, networking and connecting with your existing clients. It stands for customer service, public relations and sales. It means doing everything your time, your budget and your resources will allow to grab and keep top-of-the-mind-awareness in your target market’s world.

Saturation Marketing
is taking time to think and to use your creative problem solving skills to identify vertical marketing opportunities as well as new uses for your products in new markets. It is spending time in your community giving back to those who have made you a success.

Saturation Marketing
means looking at every opportunity to present yourself and your company to the people who would buy from you. It takes some time and effort but the payoff is great. Are you ready to do Saturation Marketing?

From The World’s Shortest Ezine by Tom Letourneau (800) 845-7553 / http://www.TomSpeaks.net.

My challenge to you is to create a plan to use “saturation marketing” to help market your center and its services, and to generate an abundance of qualified inquiries. If you need help, call me. Our goal will be to saturate your market with your image and message to the point that you are top-of-mind whenever the words child care or early care and education come up in conversations shared by your prospects, customers, and opinion influencers. Be ready, though. With that kind of effort, your email, phone lines, and drop-in visitor time slots will be saturated with prospect inquiries. Are you ready to convert them into enrollments?

Best wishes, happy marketing, and a happy New Years!

Julie Wassom
“The Speaker Whose Message Means Business”
Marketing and Sales Speaker/Consultant/Author
Call me: 303-693-2306
Fax me: 303-617-6422
E-me: julie@juliewassom.com
See me: www.juliewassom.com

Posted in Ask Julie, Budget for Marketing, Child Care Marketing, Economy, Marketing Tips, Sharing What Works, Your Business | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Closing the Sale – Making Rejection Pay Off!

Posted by juliewassom on July 30, 2013

While listening to an audio tape learning program the other day, I learned a very important lesson about courage and persistence in asking closing questions. How you think about closing has a significant impact on how easy it will be for you to feel comfortable and confident in asking a closing question each and every time the opportunity arises.

For quite some time, I have been telling center directors about author Carole Hyatt’s suggestion that it takes eight “no’s” to get to a “yes”. That means if you’ve had four “no’s”, you are well on your way to the prospect who will say “yes!” in response to your closing question. Hard as it can seem to continue asking, you must ASK or you are not closing. The people who ask continually have significantly higher sales conversions than those who merely recommend, but do not ask, and then hope the prospect will volunteer to buy.

One of the most common reasons directors do not ASK for the center visit, ASK for the enrollment, and ASK for permission to follow up is the fear of rejection. Another is the feeling of wasting your time and effort (and other resources) to get nothing in return. But think about it this way:

Let’s say you have had five prospects look at your preschool program for which you charge $150 a week. Every enrollment in this program is worth approximately $7,794 a year in revenue, depending upon how you calculate a month’s tuition. You have asked every single one of these prospects when they would like to start (or some other closing question). They all said “No,” for one reason or another. Then the sixth prospect to look at your center seems really interested and eligible, so you ask a closing question, and the prospect says, “Yes, I want to enroll!” You have secured the enrollment, but it took six times of asking to get there!

If you divide the $7,794 by the six times you had to ask prospects a closing question, it comes out to just shy of $1,300 for each time a prospect said, “No.” It’s almost as if the prospects one by one said to you, “No, I do not want to enroll, but here is $1,300 for your efforts and for asking me to enroll.”

If you can think of each negative response as a future enrollment in your center, you will feel much more willing to ask, knowing that each negative response is just money in your pocket as you’re on your way to the one who will enroll! Thinking about closing in this way can help you overcome the fear of rejection and can make it much more fun to ASK for the visit, enrollment and follow up permission. Do it, privately tally what each “no” was worth, and watch your enrollment increase!

Good luck and happy marketing!

Julie Wassom
“The Speaker Whose Message Means Business”
Marketing and Sales Speaker/Consultant/Author
Call me: 303-693-2306
Fax me: 303-617-6422
E-me: julie@juliewassom.com
See me: www.juliewassom.com

Posted in Ask Julie, Budget for Marketing, Child Care Marketing, Economy, Marketing Tips, Sharing What Works, Your Business | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Updating Your Website

Posted by juliewassom on July 23, 2013

While presenting a marketing seminar recently, one of the participants asked a very good question. He said, “How often do we need to refresh our web site?”

Though having a web site is very important, it’s not enough to just put it up and hope your prospects will visit it once and then call you. One of the goals in your web site plan is to get those visitors to come back to your site again and again. This is called “stickiness.” Once there, you can entice them to take some action on the site and hopefully, to contact you.

One of the ways to get web visitors back to your site repeatedly is to update, or refresh, it regularly. Anita Larsen, a web marketing expert here in the Denver area, says to follow the three-month rule of thumb regarding updates. At least quarterly, update pages on your site that will warrant a new look from prospects and referral sources. This might be updates of photos, calendars, or new centers or curriculum programs. Each quarter put a new article or tip sheet of interest to prospects on your page about center news. In the quarter prior to a major event at your center, be sure to add a notice or pop-up window that allows web visitors to register or put it on their own calendars.

Depending upon your setup, you webmaster can update your site, or you will have access to certain pages to update and change on your own. Learn what works for you and take advantage of this opportunity to create continued interest from your prospects.

When your website provides prospects and opinion influencers with a variety of information of value (not just advertising) on a regular rotation, you will become positioned as “the helpful, knowledgeable resource”, and that is a perception that can contribute to your prospects ultimately making a buying decision in your favor.

Do this, and then when your prospects need information, centers to visit, and a place to enroll their child(ren), your name and URL will stick in their minds like …SuperGlue!

Best wishes and happy marketing!

Julie Wassom
“The Speaker Whose Message Means Business”
Marketing and Sales Speaker/Consultant/Author
Call me: 303-693-2306
Fax me: 303-617-6422
E-me: julie@juliewassom.com
See me: www.juliewassom.com

Posted in Ask Julie, Budget for Marketing, Child Care Marketing, Economy, Marketing Tips, Sharing What Works, Your Business | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Voice Mail Marketing Secrets

Posted by juliewassom on July 16, 2013

Your voice mail message is a powerful marketing tool for giving your prospects and customers a lasting first impression. Are you maximizing its ability to be your marketing partner? Here are some tips on doing so for no cost and high impact.

Keep your message brief, professional, and concise. Make sure your voice mail picks up after no more than five rings. Most callers will not wait any longer, nor will they listen to a long drawn-out message.

Include important information your caller needs – your company name, specific center name, and city name. Add your image message or tagline, especially if it communicates a unique message about your services.

Indicate when the caller can expect a return call. Rather than saying, “We will return your call as soon as possible,” use a time frame, such as, within 24 hours. This sets up an expectation, which when fulfilled, gives you valuable credibility.

Refer caller to your website. Most parents now investigate early care and education options online. If your voice mail message refers them to your website, by the time you call them back, they will likely have even more good information about you.

Make your delivery smooth and confident. No er’s, um’s, and weak voice tones. Write out your message dialogue and practice until your delivery makes the strong, confident impression you want your caller to hear. Then record it.

Your voice mail message is a marketing tool right at your fingertips. Apply these secrets for making it an effective partner in marketing a memorable impression of you and your center.

Want more on building enrollment? I just launched my updated version of “Basic Techniques for Securing Enrollment“. So check it out! You’ll be very glad you did!

Julie Wassom
“The Speaker Whose Message Means Business”
Marketing and Sales Speaker/Consultant/Author
Call me: 303-693-2306
Fax me: 303-617-6422
E-me: julie@juliewassom.com
See me: www.juliewassom.com

Posted in Ask Julie, Budget for Marketing, Child Care Marketing, Economy, Marketing Tips, Sharing What Works, Your Business | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

WIIFM? Revised!

Posted by juliewassom on July 9, 2013

WIIFM. We all know that stands for “What’s In It For Me?” Your prospects think about this when they investigate centers for their family’s early care and education decision. Your parents consider it daily as they assess their loyalty to you while simultaneously being tempted by your competitors. Your opinion influencers wonder if their referrals will always be a one-way street, and your community marketing contacts think about it from the time you shake their hands hello.

You also think WIIFM when you try to decide whether or not to make that follow up call to a prospective parent or handle that complaint or make community contacts when other tasks seem more urgent. Let’s take just one of those situations, examine what IS in it for you, and then put a new twist on the acronym.

Follow up to an enrollment inquiry or visit. In this situation, if you follow up in a timely manner, with information of value to the recipient, and continually, here’s just some of what you get:

  • a reason to re-contact your prospect – you’ve previously told them you would follow up, so it’s legitimate – and not pushy – that you do it
  • the words to say when you follow up – “I’m calling you as I said I would, to see what questions you have at this point.”
  • another chance to secure a visit or enrollment
  • an opportunity to build the trust and credibility that is the foundation of a positive relationship
  • a chance to learn additional needs and concerns that you can address
  • a chance to ask for referrals to others whom you might serve
  • a commitment to stay organized (Use those tickler files!)
  • a competitive advantage – only a small percentage of your competitors will follow up more than once or twice

I like to say, “The fortune is in the follow up.” I have pages of testimonials as to its effectiveness in getting you what you want.

But let’s look at the WIIFM acronym another way. Start thinking “What’s In It FROM Me?” If you change your mindset to this being the motivator for your follow up action, it will become easier to do follow up when you’re uncomfortable with it or other tasks call your name.

What are you GIVING with good follow up? These and more:

  • an assurance of credibility, believability, and trust. You’re doing what you said you would do. People buy from you not because of what you say you will do, but because of what they believe you will really do.
  • demonstration that you care. People do not care how much you know until they know how much you care.
  • Once care is established, you’re giving your knowledge. When you position yourself as the helpful professional expert, you’re the one they will turn to again and again.
  • another opportunity for your prospect to make a good decision. Helping prospects make a good buying decision is an integral part of your enrollment building responsibilities.
  • the only follow up contact they got from a center that day (or even week). I was recently giving a seminar when one of the directors shared with me that a parent who was spending the day calling nannies got another follow up mailing from her. Because of it and all the previous contacts, she called the center, scheduled a visit, enrolled, and even told the director it was her follow up that made all the difference in her coming in. It also meant she got the enrollment!

Change your thinking and you can change your action and ultimately your enrollment situation. One way to do that is to start thinking “What’s In It FROM Me?”

Best wishes and happy marketing!

For more on this topic, refer to “Basic Techniques for Securing Enrollment” audio program fromThe Enrollment Building Success Library. Call our office for a full synopses of this and other programs in the library.

Julie Wassom
“The Speaker Whose Message Means Business”
Marketing and Sales Speaker/Consultant/Author
Call me: 303-693-2306
Fax me: 303-617-6422
E-me: julie@juliewassom.com
See me: www.juliewassom.com

Posted in Ask Julie, Budget for Marketing, Child Care Marketing, Economy, Marketing Tips, Sharing What Works, Your Business | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Terms of Enrollment

Posted by juliewassom on July 2, 2013

Let’s talk terms.  If prospect perception is a key deciding factor in the enrollment decision – and it is –  then it is important to think about how prospects perceive the words you say.

Say “visit” versus “tour”

You tour an institution such as a museum or another environment where you have no real emotional bond. Since the child care decision is so emotional for most parents, they will feel much more comfortable if you invite them to come for a scheduled visit, give them a walk through the center, and convert that visit into a personal enrollment experience.

Say “guest” versus “parent”

Treat visiting prospects like your special guests. Doesn’t special guest here for a visit sound warmer and more personal that a parent tour? Absolutely! Your prospects will certainly think so.

Think differently about the term “selling”

Selling early care and education services is very different from selling a product or service that the prospect may or may not need and has not inquired about. You are not door-to-door salespeople. Instead, your prospect has inquired about your services. They need and expect your assistance. So selling in this industry is two things:

  1. Helping them make a good buying decision
  2. Getting them to ACT on your recommendation

This is a much softer approach, but one that yields lots of enrollments if you do it well.

Think carefully about how you say what you mean. Your prospect’s perception of those words will impact their enrollment buying decision. Using the most appealing terms will help put that decision in your favor.

For more on this topic, refer to “Basic Techniques for Securing Enrollment” audio program from The Enrollment Building Success Library. Call our office for a full synopses of this and other programs in the library.

Good luck and happy marketing!

Julie Wassom
“The Speaker Whose Message Means Business”
Marketing and Sales Speaker/Consultant/Author
Call me: 303-693-2306
Fax me: 303-617-6422
E-me: julie@juliewassom.com
See me: www.juliewassom.com

Posted in Ask Julie, Budget for Marketing, Child Care Marketing, Economy, Marketing Tips, Sharing What Works, Your Business | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »